Author: Parent Cue

A Way to Make a Difference

Are you looking for a way for you and your family to make a difference this Christmas? What about putting Christmas in a box to have it delivered to someone who has never received a Christmas present? You can do that! Just pack a shoebox full of Christmas and deliver it to Operation Christmas Child. The Operation Christmas Child website walks you through how to pack a shoe box including what are great items to include as well as where and when you need to deliver it. You can even track your shoe box and know where in the world it is delivered. Plan a night this week to spend with your family to make a difference in a child’s life this Christmas. Have dinner together and then hop in the car to visit the local discount store. Walk through the aisles with your child choosing items that will bless another child somewhere far away. Then return home to pack up Christmas in a box. The time you spend with your family may end up beinan even better present than the one you send around the...

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Sticky Faith – Find Compromise

Dr. Kara Powell and the team at the Fuller Youth Institute have been working hard for the last six years to try to figure out how to help kids have long-term faith, or “Sticky Faith”.  We asked Kara to share a few excerpts from her brand new book that would be most helpful to parents wanting to intentionally set their kids on a lifetime trajectory of faith and service. This is an excerpt from Chapter 5 of Sticky Faith: Everyday Ideas to Build Lasting Faith in Your Kids Find Compromise If Your Kid Doesn’t Want to Go to Church About half of the time I share the importance of intergenerational worship with parents, I get asked,“Should I make my kid go to church?” Believe me, as much as I am an advocate for intergenerational worship, I’m not naïve about how teenagers feel about sitting through church. I felt that way a fair amount myself as a kid. This is a tough question, one I wish we could discuss over coffee so I could ask more questions about your kids and family. But not knowing your specific family, let me say this: while your long-term goal is intergenerational connection primarily in and with a church family, the first hurdle is to help your kid to feel like they are part of something they are choosing and enjoy. Forced friendships do not work very well...

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Imperfect Moments

By Karen Wilson I love hearing Reggie and Carey reiterate how important it is to invest in our kids in the here and now, cherishing the moments because they go by so quickly. Being reminded of this makes me more intentional about the time I have with my young ones. My family set aside time for some fun together this past weekend. All of us had this perfect picture in our heads about what it would be like. (Something like the picture above.) It’s funny how things don’t usually turn out the way we plan. We packed our bikes up and headed to a beautiful local trail. My eight-year old’s tires were low on air. After only 10 minutes of riding, Elijah was miserable and complaining. This was not at all what he had in mind. I eventually snapped at him and told him to fall behind so I wouldn’t have to hear him whine. Dad had already ridden off to escape the negativity. Sara, my six-year old, was upset because we weren’t together in a pack­–as a family–which is what she had in mind. Later that night, after Elijah’s team unexpectedly lost their first football game (another disconcerting event), we ordered pizza and started playing cards. A neighborhood kid came over and wanted to be included. When we included her, Elijah ran to his room upset because it...

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The Parent Trap

Chuck Bomar, a friend of ours here at Orange, has a big heart for college-age people. He has recently written a book directed toward parents and leaders of those who are college-aged to help bring comfort, understanding and direction. Here is an excerpt and some comforting words to those in this stage of parenting from his newly released book World’s Apart: If you are a parent, there is a reality you must be aware of: Your child desires a relationship with you. There might be some obstacles for you here. Most children have crept away from you relationally, at least some degree, throughout middle and high school. They moved from never wanting to leave your side to wanting to be dropped off two blocks away to now pursuing relationships with other people who will whelp them find out who they are apart from you. But make no mistake about it, they can never fully separate. They never stop needing their parents. It’s just that we need to adapt as parents. Regardless of what you may feel or what your child may have said last week, a relationship with you is more than a need. It’s a desire. The truth is most children don’t want to separate either. You are your child’s parent. That is a space nobody else in the world can fill. And no matter how broken your...

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Like Fine China

What happens every day in your home defines what normal becomes for your family. It may become normal to go camping every summer. It might become normal to eat turkey at Christmas but have hamburgers on Saturday. Normal might include going to school, spending an hour on homework after school, going to the movies once a month, having friends over every Friday night, and knowing that Dad is passionate about keeping his car in great shape. Parents determine what’s normal by the rhythm they establish in their homes. So—and here’s the key question—how normal is God in your home? Some of us are just old enough to have still received fine china as a wedding gift. These days, we’re wondering why it was a priority, because we never use it. Our kids don’t see it as normal because it rarely comes out of the cabinet. When it does come out, the kids figure someone special must be coming over, everyone’s concerned about whether it breaks or not, and we all tend to get a little more uptight. Consequently, our china set has missed a lot over the life of our family. It missed almost all the conversations we’ve had over dinner. It missed the laughter, the wrestling after supper, and some hilarious times with the four of us and with friends. It missed all the practical jokes we’ve played...

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