Author: Parent Cue

The Most Stressful Time of the Year

According to a survey  released by the American Psychological Association this month, nearly 75% of respondents reported unhealthy stress levels in 2010. The survey also found that parents may underestimate the impact of stress on their families. While 69% of parents say their stress has little or no impact on their children, 91% of kids ages 8 to 17 report that they can tell when their parents are stressed. You can read the full “Stress in America Report” here. There’s no doubt that in our efforts to make this the “most wonderful time of the year”, the holiday season can bring on even more stress. The “Holiday Stress Index” conducted by Harris Interactive reported that 90% of respondents say they experience stress during the holiday season. So, what is everyone so stressed about? According to another survey by the American Psychological Association, Americans list lack of money (61%), the pressures of gift giving (42%), lack of time (34%) and credit card debt (23%) as top causes of holiday stress. What are you doing to reduce your level of stress this...

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Gratitude is Good for You

Did you know that “Doctors say giving thanks, taking the time to notice positive things in your life is not only good for your psyche but it’s good for your body. University of California at Davis researchers found that practicing gratitude can lower your blood pressure and make you feel less hostile. Grateful people are less angry, less negative and usually look for the cup half full. Studies by Cornell University researchers have shown that those who are thankful appear to have lower risks of developing phobias, alcoholism, even depression. They even have stronger immune systems. Read more on the importance of being thankful...

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Parents and Kids See Quality Time Differently

More than 50% of the time, parents and children from the same family disagree about what activities are meaningful. That’s according to the National KidsDay Meaningful Time Survey, conducted by Boys & Girls Clubs of America. More children say fun-focused activities (49% vs. 35%) constitute meaningful time, whereas the vast majority of parents place instructive activities at the top of their lists (62% vs. 35%). 30% of parents believe all the time they spend with children is meaningful, regardless of what they are doing. Only 11% of kids feel the same way. Parents tend to want to enrich their parenting experience, while children desire to feel wanted and supported. Fathers appear to be more oriented to athletic or event-type activities, whereas mothers seem to be more oriented to either informal interaction or instructive activities. Does any of this surprise you?  What do you think qualifies as meaningful time?  Would the kids in your life agree? To read the article from USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), click...

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More Children are Being Raised by Grandparents

The number of children being raised by their grandparents has risen sharply since the start of the recession in 2007, according to a new Pew Research Center study that found 1 in 10 children in the U.S. now lives with a grandparent. In all, 2.9 million children are being raised mainly by at least one grandparent. That’s 4% of all children. The survey also found that spending time with grandchildren is viewed as one of the greatest benefits of growing older. Grandparents who are not the primary care takers of their grandchildren are still helping out.  More than 50% of those who are in their 60s and 70s who have grandchildren have said they helped their adult children with childcare in the past 12 months. Read the full report...

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Do you know your great grandfather's name?

An Ancestry.com survey uncovers some surprising results, including: Young Americans are looking to their roots – 83 percent of 18- to 34-years-old are interested in learning their family history. Following closely are the 35- to 54-year-olds at 77 percent and Americans ages 55+ at 73 percent. Half of Americans know the name of only one or none of their great-grandparents. Twenty-two percent of Americans don’t know what either of their grandfathers do or did for a living. Although America is known as a nation of immigrants, 27 percent don’t know where their family lived before they came to America. Seventy-eight percent of Americans say they are interested in learning more about their family history. Fifty percent of American families have ever researched their roots. In comparing regions, Southerners know the least about their roots. Only 38 percent know both of their grandmothers’ maiden names, compared with 50 percent of Northeasterners. Also, only 47 percent of Southerners know what both of their grandfathers do or did for a living, while 55 percent of Northeasterners know both grandfathers’...

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