Author: Parent Cue

Resisting the Rescue

By Tim Walker The other day in the drop-off, car-rider lane at my boys’ elementary school, one of my kids realized that he accidentally threw away something he needed for school. My first instinct was to jump the curb, go home and dig through the trash to find it. In fact, there’s something deep within me that still wants to drive 45 minutes home and do just that. My son works hard at school, he’s very conscious of his grades, and I could tell that he was pretty upset about it. I wanted to make it better for him. I resisted the urge. In fact, while we sat in the car, we talked about alternate solutions. And in my head, I also thought that he might just have to get a bad grade on that one assignment. Sometimes self-control as a parent means that I have to fight my protective instincts and let my kids go through things that might cause them pain, frustration or even disappointment. I’m finding as my kids get older, I’m having to do this more and more. We faced it recently with my oldest son and some of his schoolwork. My wife and I tried to help by getting him to school early for extra help, and asking him about assignments and tests. But the reality was that it was up to him. I’m...

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Some Kids Just Can't Be Forgiven

This past Friday at the Catalyst Conference in Atlanta, Georgia, Reggie Joiner had the opportunity to interview Geoffrey Canada, an education reformer. Canada had just enamored the audience during his main session talk, moving thousands of leaders to a standing ovation as he challenged them to make disadvantaged children a priority. The interview concluded with the Catalyst team presenting Canada with a Lifetime Achievement Award for his passion and dedication to education reform. Hearing Geoffrey Canada was one of the highlights of a very inspirational week at Catalyst and prompted this repost of an article written by Reggie after he spent some time with him in Harlem several years ago. By Reggie Joiner Some kids can’t be forgiven. That’s an awful thought. I’m not suggesting a child can do something so bad they can never be forgiven. It’s just that some kids grow up in a relational context so dysfunctional they never experience the power of authentic reconciliation. I recently had the opportunity to talk with Geoffrey Canada about children who grow up in disadvantaged environments. Canada is an education reformer who grew up in Harlem, went to Harvard and came back to Harlem to start the Harlem Children’s Zone. He has dedicated his life to give kids a better chance. He helps them get into college and into a better quality of life. In his book, “Reaching Up for...

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Cue the Parents

So how many things are you juggling right now? Come on, everyone is juggling something these days. Our worlds are like one big circus. Between marriage, work, parenting, sports, extended family, church and countless other items, sometimes we need a prompt to remind us of things that are important to us, but can get lost in the mayhem. We need a cue. What’s a cue? It’s a prompt. It’s a whisper in your ear: “Talk to your kid about this,” or “Why not try this at dinner tonight?” A nudge to talk about God, faith, life or to just have fun together. It’s a way to incorporate conversations about God and His Big Story into everyday moments—during meal time, when you’re playing a game outside, when you’re in the car. We have developed an interactive APP to help CUE parents to do three things with their kids: Connect to God’s story. Uncover something about life. Experience something together. Deuteronomy 6:5-9 says: “Love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength. These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and...

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Parenting Tweens Through Technology

Today’s highly technological and connected culture requires that parents step up their game when it comes to guiding their kids through the use of technology and social media. I saw this article on CNET recently called “How Instagram became the social network for tweens ” that really brings to light some aspects of parenting that are entirely new for our time. Here’s an excerpt: Just like Facebook, you technically have to be 13 to have an Instagram account. And, just like Facebook, Instagram is more or less a social network, dark sides included. Kids post photos, their followers comment… and then those not invited to said birthday party or shopping excursion get hurt feelings. Many of us adults discovered Instagram as a nifty photo-sharing app that’s lets you spruce up your photos with cool filters. But it has all the functionality of a social network, which Instagram founder Kevin Systrom says was by design…. According to Nielsen, for example, Instagram is the top photography site among teens ages 12 to 17, with 1 million teens visiting the site during July. Nielsen doesn’t categorize Instagram as a social network. While Flickr was top photo site for the overall population in July, Instagram was the favorite among teens, Nielsen found. Add to that an earlier Nielsen study on growing popularity of Facebook and social networks in general among teenagers, and yet...

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Show Some Respect!

My daughter recently enrolled in a tae kwon do class for a couple of months. Besides now having the ability to fend off her bigger brother with the threat of a karate chop, she came out of it more confident and surprisingly more respectful. She started responding to everything we would ask her to do with a decisive, “Ma’am, yes, ma’am!” and “Sir, yes, sir!” And then she would go do it quickly and with great pleasure! We, her parents, would just look at each other and marvel. It was beautiful! This was in direct contrast to our son, who was in this phase in which he would question, delay, and whine at every request. Besides wanting to enroll my son in the class immediately, this got me to thinking about the idea of respect. While I don’t want to make my kids feel like they are in the military, I do want them to show respect for their father and me and for all those who are in authority over them. And the primary way children show respect for authority figures is by how they treat us. I’m sure we’ve all seen children who backtalk or even scream at their parents; and like me, you may cringe when parents let that happen. Or maybe there have been times when you’re the parent whose child treats you disrespectfully and you...

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