Author: Parent Cue

What Every Dad Should Know About His Daughter

by Gina McClain Several weeks ago I was dropping my daughter off for a birthday party. As I was leaving a man stopped me asking for directions. He was standing with one of my daughter’s school friends.  Immediately recognizing her, I put my hand out and introduced myself explaining that our daughters sit together at lunch often. His reaction was sarcastic as he gave his daughter a side-ways glance. He made a negative comment regarding his daughter as he looked at her. Her response to him led me to believe those interactions are common. Witnessing the exchange made me sad. I drove away thinking of all the little things we can do as parents that either build up or tear down the hearts of our kids. It’s challenging to articulate the influence a father has on a little girl. How much of his attitude and actions toward her can determine her future relationships. I remember how much stock I placed in what my dad thought of me. I remember how much I wanted him to be proud of me. To affirm me. To show me my value. I remember how he would brag about me on the sidelines of the soccer field. How he would tell me I’m beautiful. How he would hug me so hard I couldn’t breathe. How often he reminded me as a teenager, “Never date...

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Growing Roots Deeper

by Cara Martens I’ve got to be honest—I’m more of a planter and less of a water-er. Around this time of the year, I begin to get a little itch to add some color to my world. With great care and excitement, I check out all the local offerings of plants—looking for just the right mix and price. I take most of a day to trim back (or pull out) anything that didn’t make it through the winter. Then I add in new potting soil, chock full of ingredients I can’t say or spell. And I carefully place my young new plants in a hole dug just for them and gently fill and pat the soil all around their new home. Finally, I dust off my dirty gloves and stand back to admire the overall effect. Unfortunately for my new green-stemmed friends, at this point, my passion tends to run a little dry. It’s pretty hard for me to remember to water these guys, even though I know they’re at a fragile stage of life and struggling to make it through the transition from nursery to the big world outside it. And my sweet Goldendoodle, Boomer, certainly doesn’t make it any easier for them—he’s quite fond of pulling these sweet annual blooms right out of the ground or pot for an afternoon snack. After years of battling my predisposition...

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The Includers

The summer before my 8th grade, we moved to a new state. My dad’s job relocated our family from a non-descript Midwestern community to an affluent East Texas town, steep in Southern culture. As soon as we arrived in our new city, one of my dad’s business associates introduced me to Lizzie. Undoubtedly my father’s colleague recognized that making new friends amidst middle school would be no easy chore, and certainly not in a town with generations-old cliques and social circles. So on my behalf, he invited a young family friend who was also my age to attend a small dinner gathering welcoming my family. Within seconds of first meeting Lizzie, she was coaching me on who to know and how to survive my new middle school. Over dinner that night, a friendship was begun. In many regards, Lizzie and I were unlikely peers. I was a pudgy 14 year-old with short bangs and a limited wardrobe. Lizzie was the well-dressed, perfectly manicured offspring to Texas oil aristocracy. I came from both a family and a culture where life was understated. Lizzie’s family mingled among famous names. Her world was colorful. And while it was sometimes overstated, it was always entertaining. Lizzie had a million friends. If there was something big going on, Lizzie was in the middle of it and usually in charge. Frankly, Lizzie didn’t need another...

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Rooted in Conviction

Have you tuned in to watch The Firm on TV yet? I remember reading the bestseller years ago and later watching the movie as this young lawyer graduates and gets his first job. I can still picture he and his wife celebrating by buying pizza with change they found in the couch! But then things got way more complicated and he struggled to live out what he believed, almost losing everything he really cared about in the process. This lawyer drama is just one of the newest offerings, joining a long history of popular shows from Boston Legal to more reality TV trials like Judge Judy. I think we’re drawn to these stories because of the CONVICTION (or lack of it) on display week or week. We want to see how it turns out—will the characters stay true or lose their way? The classic definition of conviction is “holding a firm and strong belief.” And conviction is not just standing for anything. The characters that we root for are standing for something that’s right. And really you’re standing by what you believe is right because you wouldn’t know how to live with yourself if you didn’t. Conviction isn’t just a strongly held opinion—it’s a powerfully held belief that’s got to be founded in something truer, deeper, and stronger than just you. This brings to mind of another trial more...

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Noah's Story

After several responses to our post earlier this week about Rick Smith and his NoahsDad.com website, we thought it might be interesting to hear Rick’s first-hand account of the journey. by Rick Smith “I’m so sorry.” Those were the first words we heard from my wife’s OBGYN shortly after our son Noah was born. Instead of flowers, streamers, bubble gum cigars, and the usual fanfare that greets a family after the birth of a child, we received those three (very powerful) words, “I’m so sorry.” From the second Noah was born, the world began to tell Abbie and me that we had just been Punk’d by God. That He just decided to take us from one story (a joyful happy one) to another (a sad depressing one.) You see, our son Noah was born with a third copy of his 21st  chromosome, otherwise known as Down syndrome. The world says that kids like Noah aren’t worth it. In fact, after Noah was born we learned of a heart-breaking statistic: over 90 percent of children who are known to have an increased “risk” for Down syndrome by prenatal testing are aborted. Let that sink in for a bit. That’s nine out of 10 children. Aborted. The world says that children like our son aren’t worth it. Abbie and I learned that Noah was born with Down syndrome a few hours after...

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