Author: Parent Cue

Noah's Story

After several responses to our post earlier this week about Rick Smith and his NoahsDad.com website, we thought it might be interesting to hear Rick’s first-hand account of the journey. by Rick Smith “I’m so sorry.” Those were the first words we heard from my wife’s OBGYN shortly after our son Noah was born. Instead of flowers, streamers, bubble gum cigars, and the usual fanfare that greets a family after the birth of a child, we received those three (very powerful) words, “I’m so sorry.” From the second Noah was born, the world began to tell Abbie and me that we had just been Punk’d by God. That He just decided to take us from one story (a joyful happy one) to another (a sad depressing one.) You see, our son Noah was born with a third copy of his 21st  chromosome, otherwise known as Down syndrome. The world says that kids like Noah aren’t worth it. In fact, after Noah was born we learned of a heart-breaking statistic: over 90 percent of children who are known to have an increased “risk” for Down syndrome by prenatal testing are aborted. Let that sink in for a bit. That’s nine out of 10 children. Aborted. The world says that children like our son aren’t worth it. Abbie and I learned that Noah was born with Down syndrome a few hours after...

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Top Posts of 2011

Happy 2012! The new year is a time to celebrate new beginnings and make new resolutions, but it’s also a time to rewind and revisit some of the top moments of the year before. I hope you’ve been able to take the time as a family to reflect on the most meaningful moments from 2011. The new year is a great opportunity to discuss with your family some of those favorite memories or even some of the more difficult ones. What’s your best memory? What do you have to be thankful for? At Orange Parents, we’re thankful for your readership and interaction with us over the past year, for sharing our posts, and spreading the word. We’re thankful for great authors like Carey, Reggie and Kendra as well as our guest bloggers. Thanks for your wisdom and wonderful insights on parenting. 1 – “How To Raise A Jerk” by Reggie Joiner Some leaders say too many who work hard at building children’s self-esteem are raising kids who will exhibit a lifestyle of entitlement and egotism. Other specialists say those who talk about children being innately bad are raising a generation that feels inferior and insignificant. Every expert has an opinion and it’s hard to know where the line actually is. Many promote their agenda by pushing the opposing opinion to the extreme. Read more…   2 – “Losing Your Marbles” by...

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New Years Resolution: Self Control

So you’ve stuffed yourself full of black-eyed peas, cabbage, and fish. You’re bound and determined to solve all the world’s problems this year… or at least lose five pounds. You promise your family and friends to be around more. You have a detailed plan to get out of debt in the next twelve months. You’re making grand plans to volunteer more, get organized, maybe learn a new language. But what happens when someone brings fresh doughnuts to the office? When you find an incredible deal for that flat screen you’ve had your eye on? When you get hooked on a new reality TV show? At Studio252 this month, we are going to talk about the very thing that can make your New Year’s resolutions more than just a great idea—self-control. We define self-control as simply choosing to do what you should do not what you want to do. So what’s fun about that?? Well, get your family together for some of these activities and find out just how fun learning about self-control can be! Watch as the studio252 team learns a very important lesson about just how important self-control can be! Practice self-control by playing a classic game of Simon Says. Bake a batch of cookies together—without eating all the dough! Let your kids show off their self-control skills by pushing the cart next time you’re at the store!...

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Making Christmas Better

by Mike Jeffries I’m writing this post from the Latin American nation of Nicaragua where, over the past few days, we’ve had an interesting international experiment in global generosity from the perspective of five young children. Three families decided one of the best Christmas gifts would be to take their kids to work among other children in the this second-poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. (The average income in Nicaragua is less than $200 a month.) One of the dads is a cardiologist who brought his seven-year-old son. He met his wife here on a mission trip when he was in college, so he wanted to show young James where Mom and Dad met. Another one of the dads brought his seven-year-old daughter, Isabel. He’s a news photographer so he and his daughter stood side-by-side, each with their cameras capturing unbelievable images. The third dad has been serving in Iraq and Afghanistan as a pilot in the Air National Guard, but got a week off to spend with his wife and three kids — 10-year-old Jacob, nine-year-old Gabrianna and seven-year-old Zach — and they decided to spend their vacation here in Nicaragua. Each one of these families had the same objective: make their own Christmas better by making Christmas better for someone else. Five kids, and three of them only seven years old. They walked from dirt-floor shack to...

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How to Be Rich

With December here, we don’t have to wonder what our kids are thinking about. They’re making their lists and checking them many more times than twice. It might be a toy car for a child or a first car for a teenager. From Fisher-Price to Ford, there’s something for everyone at every age during this season of giving. As focused as our kids may be on what they’re getting for Christmas, sometimes that makes it even more surprising how much they want to give. The New York Post Office even has an Operation Santa division, where they watch for letters to Santa where kids describe someone in need. Volunteers match donors to the kids’ unselfish requests. The postal service’s Director of Elf Operations expects about two million such letters this Christmas, just in New York alone. Children seem to be the first to notice the homeless man on the street or know about the family with the unemployed dad. They’re wired for generosity, and how we approach the holidays will help determine if they stay that way. In each one of our lives, we have a tendency to move toward a lifestyle of generosity or a lifestyle of greed. Are we wrapped up in ourselves or our things, or do we reflect God’s character by giving freely to others? Kids will see this most clearly when parents and leaders...

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