Dan Scott has extensively researched the power of story. In this episode, he talks with Kristen Ivy about how kids are wired to use stories, even fictional stories, to help them process the world around them, to learn empathy, and to gain perspective. Parents can use stories to teach important life principles and start meaningful conversations.

Dan Scott has extensively researched the power of story. In this episode, he talks with Kristen Ivy about how kids are wired to use stories, even fictional stories, to help them process the world around them, to learn empathy, and to gain perspective. Parents can use stories to teach important life principles and start meaningful conversations.

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RESOURCES FROM THIS EPISODE

What Should Kids Know About Good Friday?

What Should Kids Know About Good Friday?

It's Good Friday–one of the most humbling, powerful and difficult days Christians observe. To think about the trial, torture and execution Jesus endured for humanity's sake is truly astounding. If you're like most of us, you might struggle to figure out how to talk to...

Embracing What’s To Come

Embracing What’s To Come

I remember being told from day one of parenting, that the years would go by fast. That I should be “numbering my days.” And like all mothers, I accepted the nostalgic platitude, and then went about worrying how I would make it through the next 24 hours—the immediacy...

When You Need More Hope

When You Need More Hope

It’s a learned ability to see a bigger picture. Life experience helps us look back and see it better from where we are standing now. Practice looking for the good that has come from the bad, and find hope for the future. And when your child hits a moment or season of despair, you can help them rehearse the things they’ve faced before. The skinned knee that got better. How they finally mastered reading, even though it was so frustrating for so long. How they made new friends, even after the big move.

Write Your Own Narrative

Write Your Own Narrative

Do you ever wonder how this type of thinking might affect our kids? At school and with activities, they’re getting more and more specialized. They define themselves early on as performers, artists, soccer players, or STEM experts. This is a good thing—mostly. But what if we let all this specialization go unchecked? What if we define them so specifically that they don’t feel the freedom to explore new facets of who they are . . . or who they could be?

What to Do When Your Adult Child Is Messing Up

What to Do When Your Adult Child Is Messing Up

When your young-adult kids have serious adult-sized problems, the kind that can derail a healthy and productive life, your heart may break, but your child’s choices don’t have to break you. Your child’s regrettable decisions do not make you a bad parent. Even good parents have children who make poor choices. It may be too late for prevention, but it’s never too late for redemption. 

Miracles do happen. Sometimes they take the form of a rapid change, but most times they are a slow climb toward a better life.

Hope Boomerangs Back

Hope Boomerangs Back

“Pray for others that you may be healed,” (James 5:16). These words wouldn’t leave me alone. I really needed some encouragement––a prayer, a note, anything. From somebody. From an “other.” Six months into my Josiah’s autism diagnosis, I was enticed by waves of despair.

I needed someone to listen, to ask about “it,” but more importantly, to really understand. But my usual support system was eerily silent and I felt like we had been relocated to the Island of Misfit Toys. I put on my smile every day, but I was a wreck inside and dismayed that few seemed to pick up on my need.

Special Needs Parenting is Too Big to Do Alone

Special Needs Parenting is Too Big to Do Alone

Families affected by disability are in chronic need of supportive community to do life together. But friends and even family—all with the best of intentions—can sometimes express comments that land more hurtful than helpful. Or they withdraw, intimidated, shushed into silence for fear of getting it wrong.

Helping Your Preschooler Navigate Their Emotions

Helping Your Preschooler Navigate Their Emotions

I remember my first real cup of coffee. I’d been an occasional office-pot coffee drinker (lots of cream and sugar)—mostly because my office was freezing and the coffee was hot. Then, on a trip to California, a friend handed me a mug of freshly ground, French press,...

The Best $4 I Spend Every Week

The Best $4 I Spend Every Week

My 15-year-old daughter bet me $1 that she could spend less time on her phone each week than me. I was thrilled at this suggestion. Have you ever in your life heard of a teenager challenging you to see who can stay off an iPhone the most? That is amazing.
I accepted the challenge and said, “I’m so confident, I’ll double the stakes to $2.